Fine Blanking

1. Overview and Characteristics

Fine blanking (FB) is a stamping technique that accurately performs blanking. This principle is based on the hydrostatic pressure effect, where the plastic forming force increases when pressure is applied to metal.
In general stamping, the workpiece is placed on the die and punched with pressure. This requires an appropriate clearance between the die and punch. In contrast, in fine blanking, pressure is applied from both top and bottom with the clearance minimized.

2. Advantages

The use of fine blanking enables micron-order precision stamping, which is considered difficult with ordinary stamping. Furthermore, the sheared surface is finished smooth and clean, eliminating the need for post-processing. It is also possible to form complex shapes by combining bending, drawing, and shearing.
Another advantage is the broad range of processible materials. Fine blanking can also be used with special-purpose steels as well as metals difficult to work with, such as stainless steel and superalloys.
These benefits have contributed to increased use of fine blanking for metal parts that were conventionally manufactured by forging or casting. Today, it is an essential processing technique for manufacturing parts in a wide range of industries, including automobiles, cameras and other precision devices, medical equipment, and aerospace applications.

General image of stamping

Pressure applied from above

General image of stamping and fine blanking

Appropriate clearance is necessary between the punch and die

A
Punch
B
Workpiece
C
Die
D
Clearance
Image of fine blanking

Pressure applied from above

General image of stamping and fine blanking

Minimal clearance

A
Punch
B
Retention plate
C
Workpiece
D
Opposite pressure

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