Character size
Normal
Large
  1. Home > 
  2. Laser Marker Selection > 
  3. Glass, Paper, Ceramics, and Other

Glass, Paper, Ceramics, and Other

Understanding the various laser types and wavelengths makes marking possible on a variety of materials. However, unless the optimal laser marker for the material being used is selected, achieving the desired finish will not be possible. This section introduces how to select the optimal laser marker for glass, paper, ceramics, printed circuit boards, and other materials.


Glass

Soda glass

Marking is achieved by generating minute cracks on the glass. Repeated marking at lower power allows for clearer marking.

Single-pass marking at high power, Several large cracks are generated. / Multi-pass marking at low power, Overall marking quality is uniform.

Selection factors

CO2 laser markers that perform marking by applying heat to the target are optimal. Marking at high power can sometimes cause large cracks, so making multiple passes with low-power marking is most effective. Defocusing allows for adjustment of the thickness of lines.

Recommended model

Quartz Glass

Thermal marking melts the surface of the glass. Because quartz glass is heat-resistant, laser marking is possible without the generation of cracks.

Selection factors

CO2 laser markers that perform marking by applying heat to the target are optimal. With heat-resistant quartz glass, marking may need to be done slowly at high power to create high visibility.

Recommended model

Paper

White Marking by Removing Pre-Printed Surfaces

High-visibility marking is achieved by burning the printed surface (solid coating) using the laser. The high-contrast result allows for highly readable barcodes and other detailed marking.

Selection factors

CO2 laser markers that perform marking by applying heat to the target are optimal. Darker pre-printed surfaces allow for greater visibility. Marking for barcodes or other applications tend to take more time than regular character marking.

Recommended model

Marking on Unprinted White Paper

Marking is achieved using a high-power laser to burn the white surface of the target. When upgrading from stamping or other methods, there's no need to change the designs of cartons or other products, ensuring a smooth transition.

Selection factors

CO2 laser markers that perform marking by applying heat to the target are optimal. Residue may also be generated while marking, so a dust collector in addition to the laser marker may be required.

Recommended model

Ceramics

With zirconia ceramics, marking appears black as if the surface was burnt. With alumina ceramics, marking appears as if the surface has been melted.

Zirconia ceramics (marking using a fundamental wavelength laser marker)

Alumina ceramics (marking using a CO2 laser marker)

Selection factors

For zirconia ceramics, laser markers with the fundamental wavelength are optimal, and for alumina ceramics, CO2 laser markers are optimal. Take care when selecting the laser marker model, as the best choice will change depending on the ingredients of the target.

Recommended model

Printed Circuit Boards

White marking is performed by engraving only the surface of the solder mask. The shallow engraving allows for clear marking without exposing the pattern.

Selection factors

Marking should be performed at low power, as soot will be generated if the marking power is too high. In addition, because the fundamental wavelength laser passes through solder masks, risking damage to the pattern, CO2 lasers are best.

Recommended model

Learn More about Lasers / “What exactly is a laser?” “What are the principles behind lasers?” Whether you're interested in basic knowledge questions like these or more in-depth information such as oscillator structures, these technical references provide the answers in an easy-to-understand way. / Catalog Download

Download!

Feel free to contct us. 1-888-KEYENCE(1-888-539-3623)

Click here to contact us by website or to download materials

Back to top

Other Pages